Step by Step | How to Dry Flowers?

How to dry Lavender from Lavender Backyard Garden, a NZ lavender herb farm

Dried lavender is attractive and decorative. You could hang them in bunches for decorating your space or use them as part of a dried flower arrangement or wedding boutique. 

Lavender, just like most flowers, air-dry best when the flowers are just beginning to open.

At this stage, the flower buds have formed but the flowers have not yet opened. The closed buds lavender can retain colour longer after it dried.

How to Air Dry Lavender?

Here are few easy steps to dry your lavender:

1. Cut lavender flowers just above the leaves, with a good long stem.

2. Take about 50 stems for a bundle and tie with a rubber band. Keep bundles small so they can dry evenly. 

3. Hang the lavender bundles upside down in a dark and dry place so they don't get mould or rot before they dry completely.

4. Check them every few days to ensure the stems won't slip from the tie as they shrink during the drying process.

5. Hang it around 2 to 4 weeks for them to be thoroughly dried. 

Come to our farm during December and January to Pick Your Own (PYO) lavender. You can not only enjoy the aroma of lavender fields but also bring some fresh lavender home to dry and decorate your house.

 

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